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Braces (orthotics) for sports and daily use

 An orthosis is defined as an orthopedic device intended to support a deficient locomotor function. Sports orthotics can protect a knee, ankle, shoulder, foot or your back. They can also be placed around the joint or in a skate, ski boot, running or basketball shoe.

What is the difference between an orthosis and a prosthesis?

The daily use of an orthosis can also support a joint or foot following a car accident, fracture, surgery or in the presence of persistent pain. The prosthesis is the replacement of a joint by surgery. This is put in place by your orthopedic surgeon in the presence of severe joint degeneration (total or partial knee or hip prosthesis).
Consulting services in orthotics are available at the Montreal and Saint-Lambert clinics. We also have an orthopedic surgeon with expertise in arthrosis and joint replacements that can be seen upon referral.

Orthotics and services available at the STADIUM Clinics:

  • Immobilisation brace

  • Walking Boots (sprained ankle or foot fracture)

  • Various braces (lumbar, sacroiliac, cervical collars...)

  • Insoles: shaping elements, custom made, flexible or semi rigid

  • Specialized and preventive sports Orthotics, including knee for ligamental laxity

  • Custom braces and shoes

  • Sports shoes modifications, including skates, cycling shoes, ski boots...

  • Sports equipment modifications to protect a specific condition (football, hockey...)

  • Advise for the selection of your sports or daily shoes

  • Biomechanical assessment by computer (MAT scan)

  • Electrotherapeutic equipment rental

A few pathologies that can improve significantly with the help of an external support such as an orthosis:

  • Plantar arch problems (hollow feet, sagging foot arches, early pronator...)

  • Plantar fasciitis

  • Heel spur

  • Morton’s neuroma

  • Hallux valgus, bunion

  • Knee chondromalacia

  • Ligament instability

  • Leg length asymmetry